Spring 2016: The Transformation of Transportation

Hosted by Michigan State University Professor Nicholas Wittner, this symposium discussed the legal issues, including liability, privacy, and regulation, involved with vehicle-to-vehicle safety communications and autonomous vehicle technology. This exciting symposium merged new vehicle technology and legal implications, bringing together great minds from the legal field and auto industry to discuss the current issues.

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Fall 2015: Legal Quanta

Hosted by Michigan State University College of Law Professor James M. Chen, this symposium explored the quantitative analysis of the law. Scholars discussed the need and possibility of an infusion of new methodological energy that may better answer questions that cannot be answered by other methods. The symposium demonstrated a few techniques beyond the most commonly deployed forms of quantitative analysis in law and demonstrated how those techniques could be used to study and predict the law.

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Spring 2015: Persuasion in Civil Rights Advocacy

Hosted by Michigan State University College of Law Professors Daphne O'Regan and Bruce Ching, the Persuasion in Civil Rights Advocacy symposium was hosted on April 9-10, 2015. Exploring persuasive methods used in civil rights disputes, the symposium considered the intersection of civil rights with law and rhetoric discussing persuasive arguments in issues such as same-sex rights, abortion law, racial conflicts, voting rights, and animal rights.

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Fall 2014: Public Domain(s): Law, Generating Knowledge, and Furthering Innovation in the Information Economy

The Michigan State Law Review held the Public Domain(s) symposium in fall of 2014 from Thursday, October 2 to Friday, October 3, which was hosted by Michigan State College of Law Professors Jennifer Carter-Johnson and Adam Candeub, in conjunction with the Intellectual Property, Information & Communications Law program. The symposium centered around the conflict between patent and copyright law, which restricts public use of information, and intellectual property law, which recognizes that access to information is necessary to innovation.

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