Fall 2013: Whether the U.S. Should Become a Party to the U.N. Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women

Hosted by Michigan State University College of Law Professor Susan Bitensky, the Michigan State Law Review held a symposium in conjunction with the Lori E. Talsky Center for Human Rights of Women and Children. This symposium, held November 7-8, 2013, featured discussions that considered whether the United States should become a party to the United Nations Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women. The resulting articles were published in the 2014:2 issue of the Michigan State Law Review.

The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women in the United States: Whether, When, and What If?

Marsha A. Freeman

CEDAW in Sub-Saharan Africa: Lessons in Implementation

Johanna E. Bond

CEDAW and Gender Violence: An Empirical Assessment

Neil A. Englehart

Complements of CEDAW: U.S. Foreign Policy Coherence on Women's Human Rights and Human Security

Marilou McPhedran

The Impact of States Parties' Reservations to the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women

Linda M. Keller

What's Law Got to Do with It?: An Overview of CEDAW's Treatment of Violence Against Women and Girls Through Case Studies

Heather Monasky

CEDAW's Promise for Strengthening Law-Enforcement Accountability to Survivors of Domestic and Sexual Violence in the United States

Sandra S. Park